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gyclli:


The Washhouses of Pontrieux, Brittany, France


The Washhouses of Pontrieux / By Yann Le Biannic

gyclli:

The Washhouses of Pontrieux, Brittany, France

(via ollebosse)

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The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and something else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.
—Chuck Close (via observando)

(via acrylicalchemy)

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Whatever form of education is inflicted on children, they will always find mythical or heroic figures to satisfy their imagination. If they do not have King Arthur and Peredur or Sigurd and Regin, they will content themselves with Donald Duck and Dick Barton. It may even be argued that the latter are healthier because they are more spontaneous and near to contemporary reality than Branwen the daughter of Llyr or Burnt Njal. But are they more real because they are more at home in our impoverished world? I believe the old myths are better not only intrinsically, but because they lead further and open a door into the mind as well as into the past. This was the old road which carries us back not merely for centuries but for thousands of years; the road by which every people has travelled and from which the beginnings of every literature have come. I mean the road of oral tradition. It may be that the changes of our generation, the increased speed of life and the mechanization of popular culture by the cinema and the radio have closed this road forever. But if so, those of us who remember the world before the wars have witnessed a change in human consciousness far greater than we have realized and what we are remembering is not the Victorian age but a whole series of ages — a river of immemorial time which has suddenly dried up and become lost in the seismic cleft that has opened between the present and the past.
Christopher Dawson (via azspot)

(via azspot)

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I stopped looking for the light. Decided to become it instead.
Francheska, of 'Hey Fran Hey'   (via thatkindofwoman)

(via girlinthegreenscarf)

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humanoidhistory:

Behold the cosmic clouds in the emission nebula IC 1805, aka the Heart Nebula, about 7500 light years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia, observed by Ivan Eder. (NASA/APOD)

humanoidhistory:

Behold the cosmic clouds in the emission nebula IC 1805, aka the Heart Nebula, about 7500 light years away toward the constellation Cassiopeia, observed by Ivan Eder. (NASA/APOD)

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age-of-awakening:

underthesymmetree:

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Venus orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Earth orbits the sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

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finallyyyyyy i get to see a motion version of this<3

(via theletterkilleth)